About GXB

Genre is a idea that crosses disciplinary, national, methodological, conceptual, and pedagogical borders. The purpose of Genre across Borders (GXB) is to advance genre theory and research by helping scholars and students cross these borders. The site combines two primary functions:

  • As a reference guide to scholarship in the many fields of genre study
  • As a networking portal for scholars and teachers

GXB aims to offer a comprehensive overview of the multiple strands of genre scholarship and their relationships, in order to catalyze intellectual exchange and pedagogical innovation and to help us understand the processes and motivations of genre development, evolution, and circulation.

GXB now features translations of research introductions on our Research page. Contact us to contribute a translation. You may also select an interface display language on your Profile page.

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Sample Bibliography

[713] Dimock, W C. (2007).  Introduction: Genres as Fields of Knowledge. Publications of the Modern Language Association. 122, 1377–1388.
[627] Bazerman, C. (2003).  What Activity Systems Are Literary Genres Part of?. Readerly/Writerly Texts. 10, 97–106.

GXB Member Profile

Clau Carmona

Upcoming Events & CFP's

Tuesday September 08, 2015 (All day) to Thursday September 10, 2015 (All day)

The eighth biannual meeting of this international symposium in Brazil. There will be workshops, parallel sessions, and plenary sessions, with featured speakers Charles Bazerman, Orlando Vian, Jr., Desirée Motta-Roth, Roxane Rojo, Solange Aranha,  Vera Cristovão, Ana Maria Guimarães, Joaquim Dolz...

Monday October 05, 2015 - 9:00 am to Thursday October 08, 2015 - 4:00 pm

University of Copenhagen, Faculty for Humanities, PhD School

The course is co-led by Amy Devitt, University of Kansas, and Sune Auken, University of Copenhagen.

No matter where you go in society, and no matter what you do, you will be encapsulated by genres. Genres are active in...

Glossary Sample

The "full range of the kind of texts" that one person uses to fill out one side of a "multiple person interaction." (Bazerman, 1994, p. 98).


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